The Insider's Guide to
Crater Lake's Backyard
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Horse packing

by 30 Mile Admin

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June at Crater Lake

by 30 Mile Admin

Crater Lake is always beautiful, and right now it’s spectacular.  This was a heavier-than-normal snow year, but now the weather is warm and sunny and visitors get to enjoy the last of the white stuff.  This is a view from the Lodge on June 17 when we saw saw folks relaxing on the veranda, kids playing in the snow, and one young man successfully juggling snowballs.  The north entrance to the park is expected to open by about June 25, but the south entrance is open year-round.  On this day we saw license plates from California, Washington, Kansas (4 motorcycle couples), Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Idaho, Colorado,

June day at Crater Lake

June day at Crater Lake, (c) Julie Black

Florida, and visited with a couple from Italy.

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Spring in the marsh

by 30 Mile Admin

Spring paddle, June 4

Spring paddle

What a wonderful place to be in the spring! The marshes and their woody edges along the north end of Upper Klamath Lake are filled with nesting families from warblers to white pelicans. (See this website’s Paddle Sports page) While paddling the last 2 days south of the Rocky Point boat lauch, we saw great blue herons, green and night heron, mallards, woodduck, ring neck duck, western and pied billed grebes, yellow-rumped warbler, Wilson’s warbler, yellow warbler, yellow headed and red winged blackbirds, great egret, Forster’s and black terns, sandhill crane, Lewis woodpecker, song sparrow, marsh wren, cedar waxwing, blackheaded grosbeaks, and white pelicans.

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Southern Oregon too has our own version of “termination dust”. What’s that you say? S-N-O-W…

Southern Oregon Cascades Termination Dust

Southern Oregon Cascades Termination Dust

In Alaska, residents of Anchorage watch the snow level march down the surrounding mountains and it’s called “termination dust” — the end of summer. And yet while some may think of it as something good coming to an end, those of us who live in the mountains — whether the Chugach in Alaska or the Cascades in Oregon — we know better. Termination dust is the end of heat, dusty roads and bugs…and the start of a most magical season for those of us lucky enough to live or vacation near Crater Lake.

There’s still plenty of birds — several hundred species call the Klamath Basin home year-round, and winter is an especially good time to view eagles and other raptors. Plenty of wildlife out and about as well, and the snow makes it far easier to see their activity by spotting and following their tracks.

This season is starting out with a bit of a bang — an early opening to the “storm door” and several inches of fresh powder on the ground BEFORE Thanksgiving — Wahoo! If you’re interested in snowmobiling on some of the best trails and powder anywhere in the West (anywhere! West Yellowstone and Park City, eat your hearts out), or finding all the solitude you could possibly hope for, the area around the south-east side of Crater Lake is just made for you. We’ve got several hundred miles of groomed multi-use trails, nordic only trails, wide open spaces to snowshoe, and more stars on a clear crisp night than you’ve ever seen. Our area is home to avid cross country skiers, dog sledders, snowshoers, snowmobilers, and lots of folks who just know how to have a good time outdoors this time of year. The other option is always to curl up in front of the fire with a good book and some yummy hot cocoa…

The Snow Finally Made it All the Way Down the Mountain!

The Snow Finally Made it All the Way Down the Mountain!

Avoid the crowds, avoid the conga lines of cars, avoid parking hassles, avoid the high resort prices and come share our winter wonderland. Of course, Crater Lake in the winter is unparalleled beauty…our winter wonderland adjoins the South Entrance to Crater Lake National Park, which is the entrance that is open year-round.  We’ve got lodging and dining options awaiting you…hope to see you out on the trail soon!

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Come to Collier State Park north of Chiloquin on August 29 for a great bluegrass jam.  All musicians and listeners are welcome.  The fun starts at 1 p.m. with great music in a beautiful setting. (541) 281-5994 for more info.

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Michael Quinn, singer-songwriter, will present a free concert Aug. 22., 6 p.m., on the deck at Lake of the Woods Resort.  Come and enjoy his “true Nashville style”.

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Did you ever visit a gallery and wonder how an artist creates his work or have questions you’d love to ask if only you could talk to the creator of that wonderful piece of art? You will have your chance when Two Rivers Gallery presents artists and their artwork at our Second Annual ‘Meet the Artists’ fundraiser.

Wetland Watch by Joanne Baeth

Wetland Watch by Joanne Baeth

Featured this year are:

Quilt Artist Joanne Baeth

Bead Artist Diane Eldridge

Watercolor artist Janet Tarjan Erl

Woodworker Wolf Hodgkinson

Origami Expert Barbara Turner

Once again there will be foot-tapping live music and a tasty variety of refreshments will be served.

You won’t want to miss this fun and informative afternoon. And, your attendance also supports our gallery and many local artists. Two Rivers Gallery is a non-profit gallery established to give local artists a venue for their art, and is run entirely by volunteers.

The event will be held in the Chiloquin Community Center, 140 So. 1st St., from 1 pm ‘til 4 pm. on Saturday August 28th, 2010

Tickets are $5 per person.

Contact Two Rivers Gallery at 541-783-3326 or info for more information

Silently Waiting, by Janet Tarjan Erl

Silently Waiting, by Janet Tarjan Erl

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‘Tis wildflower season in the Upper Klamath Basin! I went out today and took some pictures just on my property at  Crystalwood Lodge, and was amazed at the variety I saw.

Klamath Basin WildflowersMeadow wildflowers

A great way to slow down and “smell the roses”. While I didn’t see any roses, I sure did see a huge variety of native wildflowers, most of whom bloom July – Sept.

Delicate wildflowersDots of color in the meadow

From asters to yarrow, and everything in between….

Asters in the meadowyarrow everywhere!

While this is the “slow season” for birding, between the summer nesting and fall migrations, there’s still plenty to see and do.

Elderberry flowers

And while you’re at it, can you help me identify these???

Mystery Wildflowers IMystery Wildflowers II

Even more wildflowers are on display at Crater Lake National Park, so get out your guide books and come explore!

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